Feast of the translation of St. Thomas Becket

 Saturday 7th July at 8pm: Mass of the Translation, in Canterbury Cathedral Quire.

 

Woodcut of St Thomas’s martyrdom.

 

History of the translation (Just a fraction of it!)

The feast of the Translation of St. Thomas Becket on 7th July commemorates the anniversary of the translation (removal from one place to another) of the relics of St Thomas Becket in 1220.  50 years after his death, St. Thomas’ tomb in Canterbury Cathedral was opened so that the relics moved to a grander shrine.  Known as Henry II’s “troublesome priest”, the martyr had been canonised in 1173, less than three years after his murder in the cathedral on 29 December 1170. Famed for his heroic defence of the church in the face of extraordinary political pressure, St. Thomas’ prominence as a Christian leader had come at the expense of friendship, position, security and, ultimately, his life. After his death, the saint’s popularity had continued to grow in response to a common belief, in his sanctity and the healing power of his blood, that had sprung up in Canterbury.

However, the translation of the relics were not only intended to be an occasion to honour the saint but also set the stage for a new, period of reconciliation, though this turned out to be short-lived. Presided over by Archbishop Simon Langton, St. Thomas’ persecutor’s teenage son, Henry III, was present, together with royalty, nobility, bishops and archbishops from across Europe. Great crowds of people attended. Positioned behind the great altar, the shrine had been allocated the most prominent position in the cathedral but was later destroyed in the reformation.

 

The relevance of the feast of the Translation today

One of the reasons that we continue to honour the feast of the translation is because in so doing we are, collectively, able to pause for reflection on how this pivotal moment in history is still relevant to our lives. St. Thomas Becket lived a life notable for his exemplary commitment to Christ, demonstrated most of all by extraordinary integrity, in spite of the personal risk involved and that ultimately cost him his life.

We are not all called to be martyrs but there was much about the saint’s life that provided a good model for us today. Although the church certainly does not recommend the severe practices that St. Thomas maintained1,  it is right that we should hold ourselves accountable for our sins, seeking absolution through the sacrament of reconciliation.

St. Thomas was also known to have enjoyed an ostentatiously materialistic lifestyle which provided some cause for concern when he entered the church. However, after he was appointed archbishop, he adopted an ascetic lifestyle, increased the funds available to support the poor and is even reported to have made a daily habit of washing the feet of thirteen poor people at his home, after which he would feed them and give them  money2.

Each of us has the potential to reach out to those who are less fortunate than ourselves, to those who are in pain, need, fear or distress. It may not be practical or possible to provide the Christ-like hospitality to 13 people each day that Thomas indulged in but sometimes the smallest, ordinary gesture can be transformative in the day of another person. Just as the woman afflicted with haemorrhages for twelve years, described in today’s Gospel, reached out in faith, if we will do likewise then we open the way for grace to follow.

In fact, Thomas appears also to have been living the model given in 2 Corinthians that we heard at Mass today:

“For you know the gracious act of our Lord Jesus Christ,
that though he was rich, for your sake he became poor,
so that by his poverty you might become rich.
Not that others should have relief while you are burdened,
but that as a matter of equality
your abundance at the present time should supply their needs,
so that their abundance may also supply your needs,
that there may be equality.”

As Fr. Daniel explained in the homily today, healing the woman who had suffered so long, cost Jesus something. As she reached out and touched the hem of his cloak, she didn’t know it but she was touching the fringe of heaven. “Aware at once that power had gone out from him”,  His restoration of her health is His response to her courage to ask for help, inspired by her faith.

Prayer

Lord, grant that I may today give of myself to those in need, recognising your face in all.

Action

The second collection today, rather fittingly, was for the SVP. Of course, there are many ways to respond to God’s call to love one another. However, if you would like to reach out in compassion to the vulnerable and lonely of the local community, as part of this wonderful organisation, please contact the parish office for more information.

Photos from the Mass of the Translation of St Thomas of Canterbury on 7 July 2018 at Canterbury Cathedral

 


 

1 “After becoming archbishop, Thomas Becket went through a drastic transformation and changed his entire lifestyle. Before he had lived ostentatiously but now he became an ascetic. He became devout and austere ..”  Source: 

http://spartacus-educational.com/

2 “Herbert of Bosham claims that after being appointed as archbishop, Thomas Becket began to show a concern for the poor. Every morning thirteen poor people were brought to his home. After washing their feet Becket served them a meal. He also gave each one of them four silver pennies. John of Salisbury believed that Becket sent food and clothing to the homes of the sick, and that he doubled Theobald’s expenditure on the poor. ” Source: http://spartacus-educational.com/

Anselm Study Circle

  • This new study circle /Group gathers to discuss and debate all theological and philosophical issues. Its purpose is to nurture a greater understanding and appreciation of difficult concepts and terminology; learning of emerging ideas and sentiments of the theology, philosophy, and Christian faith and the application of its rules to the contemporary world.
  • This is an open and free discussion forum, and not doctrinal; all in a relaxed setting.
  • The suggested format is to discuss selected articles published in theological or philosophical scholarly journals in particular Communio or Concilium.
  • We link this group with St Anselm, our Canterbury Doctor of the church and one of the prominent medieval theologian.
  • The meeting will be of special appeal to those with interest in Theology, philosophy and the study of religious faith, practice, and experience. It is especially suited for academic staff, teachers, research associates, undergraduate and graduate students and interested laypersons who wish to discuss theological and philosophical topics in some depth.
  • We suggest meeting once every two months (6 times per years) for 1.5 to two hours.
  • The suggestion for the first meeting is on Monday 2nd October 2017 at 7:00 PM in the Upper Room at  St Thomas of Canterbury RC Church. We will discuss our modus operandi and how to run this group at the first meeting.
  • If you are interested, please email Prof Ghazwan Butrous G.butrous@kent.ac.uk expressing your interest in attending, and your special interest in the subject.

Mass of the Translation of St Thomas of Canterbury At Canterbury Cathedral 7 July 2017

Mass of the Translation  of St Thomas of Canterbury At Canterbury Cathedral 7 July 2017

 

The sermon of Fr Robert McCulloch, Procurator-General; Missionary Society of St Columban; On the occasion of the Mass celebrated in Canterbury Cathedral for the feast of the Translation of the Relics of St. Thomas Becket, 7 July 2017

Know this, that although the world rages, the enemy rises, the body quivers, and the flesh is weak, I shall, God willing, never give in shamefully or commit the offense of abandoning the flock that is entrusted to me.” St Thomas Becket said this in the first week of October 1164 at a council called by King Henry II at Northampton during which those issues of principle became clarified for Becket and from which he determined not to withdraw and not to compromise.

Blessed Oscar Romero

We may recall the words of the Collect Prayer of this evening’s Mass when we prayed to God “who gave the martyr Saint Thomas Becket the courage to give up his life for the sake of justice”.  These words lead us to recall the parallel between St Thomas Becket and Blessed Oscar Romero. Both martyrs. Martyrs for that justice which is the right ordering of human decisions and actions and choices according to the will of God. The fear of dire and dreadful and death-dealing consequences could not overcome their stubbornness in preferring to affirm God’s justice rather than succumb to the standards of justice proposed by the contemporary political authority of their time and country. In the case of Becket, King Henry II was the political authority who accepted no limits and who wished to make the church merely his holy servant. In the case of Romero, the political authority of El Salvador legislated for all but ruled solely for its own vested benefit and interest. Becket’s and Romero’s stubbornness were perceived as foolishness because they threw away the opportunity to share in power. They chose not to share flawed power exercised by flawed political structures according to flawed standards of justice. The contrary foolishness indecision that these two martyrs chose is that about which St. Paul speaks and which surges in the heart and mind and will to enable conscience to say what must be done. The enduring firmness of this cathedral tonight enables us to look about not merely with bodily eyes, but with eyes of memory and embrace the stream of Christian witnesses and martyrs who speak to us from history and affirm the primacy of conscience as we stand before God and man. Not for nothing did Cardinal Newman remark “to the Pope indeed, but to conscience first”. St Peter and the martyrs of the early church, Becket almost 800 years ago, Romero just four decades ago. On several occasions in recent weeks, most recently being 29 June on the feast of St. Peter and St Paul, Pope Francis has highlighted the witness we now in these days, receive from our Christian brothers and sisters who are being persecuted in many places and countries because of their steadfast commitment to the faith which they hold as the anchor for their living. Pope Francis has noted that 80% of all people in the world who are suffering religious persecution today in our day are Christians.

Being on the threshold of the 500th anniversary of the Reformation enables us to hear those clarion and challenging words “Here I stand, I can go no further” with wider historical insight and ecumenical humility as a restatement of what it is that has enabled and still enables the martyrs to shed their blood rather than shed their principles. We remember the 47 young Anglican and Roman Catholic Ugandan martyrs of the late 19th century who suffered brutality and were cast into the fires. Their bodies were broken, their lives were burnt away because they chose God’s justice instead of the perverse ways of King Mwanga II. The memory of that political power in Uganda who ordered their death has been eroded by the memory of his victims whose witness of faith and moral principle rises before us each year on their feast day. Our enriched historical knowledge enables us to rise above the huge divides which separated Latimer and Ridley from Roman Catholics and Campion from the Reformation so that we perceive and understand that it was for principle and conscience that they would not turn from being killed.

What we are celebrating tonight took place on 7 July 1220. The occasion of this evening when we commemorate the Translation of the Relics of St. Thomas Becket from the undercroft to the Trinity Chapel in the upper Cathedral, but also the setting of this cathedral where he was martyred, where he was venerated by Christian pilgrims for 300 years, and where his presence and memory continues to be recalled by pilgrims in worship and prayer and by visitors in their own way, alert us. We are alerted to remember and celebrate not only Becket but also the long enduring and continuing testimony of our martyrs to principles which flow from faith and which are carved into conscience and from which there can be no turning.

In and of our present day and about numerous countries, well may we ask whether faith can be conformed to a political party’s manifesto which has been cobbled together to save a majority rather than to serve the common good, whether principle remains intact if it can be changed by a caucus vote, whether conscience can retain its integrity if it must be contorted to embrace certain party platform planks which are touted as the means to electoral salvation but which are more often and mostly white-anted by ambition. “Here I stand, I can go further”. “… The King’s best friend, but God’s first”. “Will no-one rid me of this troublesome priest”.

The shrine of Becket has gone, his bones are mostly scattered, but he lives in devotion and historical memory.  It is most likely that the great 13th century Catholic theologian St. Thomas Aquinas was named not after the apostle of Our Lord but after the martyr of Canterbury. Aquinas was born in 1225. His father’s lands included the town of Segni between Rome and Naples and it was in Segni that Pope Alexander III canonised Thomas Becket in 1173.

Becket is a saint from that time in history when we were one in faith. Today at this Mass and earlier at Evensong we, Roman Catholics and Anglicans, have celebrated the enduring memory of Becket. He is a witness of fidelity overcoming fear, of constancy in great tribulation, of trust in God when confronted with wild hatred. Becket speaks to us about friendships lost, about having to put up with whisper campaigns and in-the-face opposition, about making mistakes because of uncertainty, about wanting to live a pure and chaste life, about choosing between having it all and holding to principles, about wanting to be united to God, about doing what conscience says is right, about not being trapped by political correctness, about being both full of fear and courageous just as he was in the last when he fell under swords that came from the king.

Dean Robert Willis
Pope St Gregory the Great

We acknowledge tonight the ecumenical hospitality and kindness of Dean Robert Willis. He has opened to us this evening not only the doors of this great cathedral but also the heart of the Anglican Church.  On this day just two years ago in 2015, a cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church celebrated Mass at the High Altar of the cathedral, the first to do so since Cardinal Reginald Pole. It happened because of the great generosity of Archbishop Welby and the “all things can be done” working of Dean Willis. Pope St. Gregory the Great sent St Augustine to do great things for God in England. Dean Willis has done great things for God by drawing the hearts of Anglicans and Roman Catholics closer to each other. Cardinal Newman’s motto was cor ad cor loquitur: heart speaks to heart. Greatly and in many ways Dean Willis has enabled our hearts to speak to one another as they do tonight. I should like to present to him a gift from Rome as a reminder that, as Augustine being sent by St Gregory did great things for God, so Dean Robert has done great things in the sight of God so that we may be one again. The gift to seal our thanks is a relic of Pope St Gregory the Great.

Honouring the Very Reverend Robert Willis, Dean of Canterbury with relic of St Gregory the Great